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VWML Lectures: December 2016 - March 2017

VWML Lectures: December 2016 - March 2017

After the highly successful first Library Lecture series, the VWML is pleased to announce its second series of evening lectures covering folk song, music, and folklore, presented by expert guest speakers.

Malcolm Taylor

Recipients of the Malcolm Taylor grant for Folk Collections announced

We are delighted to announce two recipients of the inaugural Malcolm Taylor Grant for Folk Collections.

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Broadside Day 2017: Call for papers

The Broadside Day is our annual gathering of people interested in Street Literature – a field which includes broadsides, chapbooks, prints, woodcuts, penny histories, last-dying speeches, catchpennies, and all other cheap printed material which was sold in urban streets, country fairs and other events up to the early 20th century.

Cecil Sharp

Cecil Sharp collects his first Appalachian song

On this day one hundred years ago, Cecil Sharp and Maud Karpeles noted down their first Appalachian song, beginning a musical journey that would span three years, and the effects of which continue to greatly impact the Appalachian folk song tradition and its study today.

The Histories of the Morris in Britain

Call for papers: The Histories of the Morris in Britain

Organised in partnership by The Historical Dance Society with The English Folk Dance and Song Society and The Morris Ring, The Morris Federation, Open Morris.

The focus of the conference is morris dancing in all its forms (including rapper, long sword, molly, and other ceremonial dance) within the British Isles and its history up to recent times. As an enduring feature of British culture across more than six centuries, research in, and understanding, appreciation and practice of, our vernacular dance genre is worth celebrating. We invite contributions from practitioners and scholars to this two-day event to share practice, archival research, oral history and local custom. This may be in the form of papers and talks for 30 minute slots to include discussion time, or workshops of 90 minutes, or posters. We hope to publish selected papers in a volume of proceedings.